A Flexible View Control for XPages Part 7 – Modals & Picklists

While I intended to get to this blog post eventually, the urgency of doing so was increased due to the following post on StackOverflow:

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/61061571/xpages-flexible-view-control

The OP also reached out to me directly looking for an answer so why not crank out a blog post with the answer?

By combining the Flexible View Control with a Bootstrap modal, you can easily mimic the Lotus Notes Picklist functionality. Getting the control working in a Bootstrap modal requires only a few simple steps, illustrated in this working demo.

Step 1 – Add the modal source to your page

I start with something like this:

<!-- Modal -->
		
		<div class="modal fade picklist" id="myModal" tabindex="-1" role="dialog"
		aria-labelledby="myModalLabel">
		<div class="modal-dialog" role="document">
			<div class="modal-content">
				<div class="modal-header">
					<button type="button" class="close" data-dismiss="modal"
						aria-label="Close">
						<span aria-hidden="true">x</span>
					</button>
					<h4 class="modal-title" id="myModalLabel">Choose a record</h4>
				</div>
				<div class="modal-body" style="display:flex;">
					<!-- place the Flexible View Control here -->
				</div>
				<div class="modal-footer">
					<button type="button" class="btn btn-default" data-dismiss="modal">
						Cancel</button>
					<button type="button" class="btn btn-primary">OK</button>
				</div>
			</div>
		</div>
	</div>

For the most part, the code above is straight off the Bootstrap site with a few important additions:

  • I added the class ‘picklist’ to the ‘modal’ div.
  • I add an inline style to ‘modal-body’ of ‘display:flex;’. This is very important since the control uses Flexbox (more on that in a future post).

Step 2 – Add the control to your page

Drop the control in the space bookmarked in the source above and configure the control as you do for a normal view page. Make sure you keep the modal-body intact!

Step 3 – Check your View Definition

It is highly recommended to have the Load on Init property unchecked. You will see why in a moment.

Step 4 – Resize the modal

By default, the Bootstrap modal is pretty small. Of course, the dimensions can be changed with css, but how do you deal with different screen sizes? By adding an event handler to the ‘show’ event of the Bootstrap modal, you can resize the modal to a percentage of available screen space:

<xp:scriptBlock>

			<xp:this.value><![CDATA[$(".picklist").on('show.bs.modal', function () {

	var mbHeight = $(window).height() * 0.8;
	$('.modal-content').css('overflow-y', 'auto'); 
	$('.modal-body').css('height', mbHeight-50);
	
	$('.modal-body').css('overflow', "auto");
	$('.modal-dialog').css('width', $(window).width() * 0.9);
	
});

</xp:scriptBlock>

In the code above, my modal-body will be 80% of the window height and 90% of the window width.

Step 5 – Load the view after the modal is opened

This is an important step due to the way DataTables draws the table and dynamically sizes the table and its cells. Initializing the table too soon results in a table that is not formatted properly:

Badly formatted DataTable when view is built before the modal has been completely rendered.

In this example above, the view is built during the ‘show’ event, resulting in the table header dimensions not matching up to the actual data rows.

Lucky for us, Bootstrap has another event that we can tap into. You may have noticed it in the screenshot above. The ‘shown’ event fires AFTER the modal has been rendered to the user:

By adding 3 lines of code to the scriptBlock above and tapping into the ‘shown’ event, our table will be built with the proper layout dimensions.

$(".picklist").on('shown.bs.modal', function () {
	viewBasic.build();
});

In the snippet above, viewBasic refers to the ‘thisView’ property of the control. Since the ‘Load on Init’ property is unchecked on the View Definition, the view needs to be triggered by its ‘build’ function.

Step 6 – Patch the csjsCCRestView.js file

After completing the steps above, the modal will work fine and the table will load and be fully functional. However, in creating this demo I realized there is an adjustment that needs to be made to the source code. This is due to legacy code that was used when many aspects of the control were being sized dynamically with javascript prior to implementing Flexbox.

The issue is the footer is being calculated based on the window’s dimensions and not the modal’s, resulting in the width of the interior of the modal being wider than the modal container. This will be updated on the github repo, but in the short term you can fix it in your database by updating the buildFooter function in the ccRestView.js file with the code below. The fixes are labeled ‘//MODAL FIX’. A few lines are commented out and a few are altered.

buildFooter : function(o) {
		
		if (o==null) { return; }
		if (o==undefined) { return; }
		console.log("=== start build footer for " + o.thisView + " ===")
		if ($(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).length > 0) {
			// check to see if the info is in the footer.
			// if so, set it aside and pick it up later
			//$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).remove();
		// MODAL FIX	$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).css("max-width",$(".dataTables_scrollBody table",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).outerWidth()+"px")
		// MODAL FIX	$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).css("min-width",$(".dataTables_scrollBody table",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).outerWidth()+"px")
			 return;
		}
		var cellCount = $("th",$(".panel"+o.thisView + " " + o.dataTableClass + " thead")[0]);
		footerAttachTo = o.viewport == "" ? "body" : o.viewport;
		var tableWidth = "100%"; //$(".panel"+o.thisView + " tbody").outerWidth();
		var tdCells = [];
		var rowOne = $(".panel"+o.thisView + " tbody tr");
		//console.log("rowOne length=" + $(rowOne).html())
		// create footer cells to match header
		for (x=0;x<cellCount.length;x++) {	

			cell = $("td",rowOne).length == 1 ? $("td",rowOne) : $("td",rowOne)[x]

			var paddingLR = ($(cell).outerWidth() - $(cell).width())/2 + "px";  // css("width") //$("td",rowOne).css("padding");   // ($(o.cellCount[x]).outerWidth() - $(o.cellCount[x]).width())/2 + "px";
			var border = ($(cell).outerWidth())
			tdCells.push("<td data-column='" + o.itemIndexes[x] + "' class='" + o.itemNames[x] + "Foot' style='width:" + $(cell).width() + "px;padding:" + paddingLR + "'> </td>");  //padding-left:" + paddingLR + ";padding-right:" + paddingLR + "
		}


		var pos = $(footerAttachTo).position();
		// get the width of the fixed header so we can apply it to
		// the footer
		width = $(footerAttachTo).css("width");
		footerAtachTo = footerAttachTo != "" ? footerAttachTo : "body";
		//console.log("attaching footer to " + footerAttachTo);
		var footerHtml = "<div class='ffDefault " + o.ffClass + "' style='width:" + width + "'><table style='width:" + tableWidth + "px' class='fixedFooterTable cell-border'><tfoot><tr>" + tdCells.join("") + "</tr></tfoot></table></div>";
		if (o.showFixedHeader) {
			width="auto"; // MODAL FIX
			var newFooter = $(".dataTables_scroll",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).after("<div class='ffDefault " + o.ffClass + "' style='width:" + width + "'><table style='width:" + tableWidth + "' class='fixedFooterTable cell-border'><tfoot><tr>" + tdCells.join("") + "</tr></tfoot></table></div>");
			$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).prepend($(".dataTables_info",$(".panel"+o.thisView)))
			$(".dataTables_info",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).css({"position":"absolute","padding":"5px","float":"none"})
		} else {
			width="auto"; // MODAL FIX
			var newFooter = $(".panelRestView",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).append("<div class='ffDefault " + o.ffClass + "' style='width:" + width + "'><table style='width:" + tableWidth + "px' class='fixedFooterTable cell-border'><tfoot><tr>" + tdCells.join("") + "</tr></tfoot></table></div>");
		}
		
		if (footerAttachTo != "body") {
		  if (pos) {
			left = $(footerAttachTo).css("position") == "relative" ? 0 : pos.left;
		  }
		}
	// MODAL FIX	$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).css("max-width",$(".dataTables_scrollBody table",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).outerWidth()+"px");
	// MODAL FIX	$(".ffDefault",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).css("min-width",$(".dataTables_scrollBody table",$(".panel"+o.thisView)).outerWidth()+"px");
		console.log("=== end build footer for " + o.thisView + " ===")
	},

In conclusion

Integrating the Flexible View Control with a Bootstrap modal is easy and provides all of the functionality of DataTables you’d expect – filtering, sorting, etc.

Postscript

For applications where multiple Picklists are needed with different data, you can create a modal custom control with custom properties that can be fed into the view control dynamically. I have one application that has at least 20-25 different Picklists and this method works great.


A Flexible View Control for XPages Part 6 – Sorting

When I started building the Flexible View Control, one of the driving forces was to significantly reduce the amount of back-end Domino views that would collect in my applications. I was just as guilty as anyone of creating a new view with the same selection formula and columns as an existing view with the only difference being the column arrangement or how the new view was sorted/categorized.

Build a Client-Side Sorting Demo

If you’ve used DataTables then you know that by default DataTables makes sorting your data by any column very easy. As a result, The Flexible View Control, being a mashup of Domino XPages and DataTables, has advanced sorting capabilities baked in.

Create a new XPage

To demonstrate this, I start by making a copy of my viewBasic XPage and call it viewBasicSorting.

Since I want to re-use this new XPage for multiple demos, I’m making my viewKey dynamic by having it look for a querystring parameter to get its value:

Using a url parameter to populate the viewKey

This means anytime I load this XPage I need to supply the name of the desired View Definition in the url:

viewBasicSorting.xsp?viewdef=used-cars-sorting-default

Create the View Definition

Now I create my new View Definition. Note that we are using an existing view and existing rest service to fetch the data.

View Definition with default sorting

In the screenshot above, there is no value in the Client Sort (1) field, meaning when the DataTable is built client-side it will display in the order the data was loaded from the rest service. If your back-end data is sorted by the 1st column, then that is how the data will display in the constructed DataTable.

viewBasicSorting.xsp?viewdef=used-cars-sorting-default

By default the id column is sorted

Adding a client-side sort

But what if your users insist on another view that sorts by Price with the Price column being first? In Notes/Domino, you begrudgingly copy your view, move the Price column to the front and make sure it’s sorted. UGH!

This is where the “Flexible” part of the Flexible View Control comes in. All I have to do is create a new View Definition, point it to the same data, and simply drag the Price column to the top and designate that as the sort column in the Client Sort (1) field. In my case I want to sort it descending.

View Definition sorted by price
Important: The value entered in the Client Sort must match the itemName of the column you want to sort.

The results

Now, I can load my view viewBasicSorting XPage and simply change the viewdef url parameter to show a different “virtual view”, in this case By Price:

viewBasicSorting.xsp?viewdef=used-cars-sorting-byprice

Same data from same view now sorted by price

Recap

Using one back-end view, and one XPage equipped with the Flexible View Control, we can display countless views to the front-end user by simply making a View Definition for each front-end view we need to display. Cool!

Advanced Sorting

When specifying the column to sort in a View Definition we use the Client Sort (1) field. But you may have noticed a field below that named Client Sort (2) and perhaps you wondered what purpose this serves.

DataTables has incredible advanced sorting capabilities, as the gif below illustrates.

Advanced DataTables sort capabilities

To get the multiple column sorting capability in the Flexible View Control, we use the Client Sort (2) field. To demonstrate I created a new View Definition that points to the same Domino view we’ve been using. This time, I make the Client Sort (1) by Year (descending) and add Price as a secondary sort, also descending.

When I look at the By Year view I can see that it has a primary sort (by year) and secondary sort (by price).

Sorting Server-side

My preference is to do all sorting client-side and have my back-end views act as fairly static tables of data that are indexed well and can respond quickly to requests. The View Definition does have a “Server Sort” field but it currently is not operable.

However, if you do need to sort server side before returning data view a rest service or xAgent you can certainly do so.

Important: to resort a back-end view server-side you must set the column sort setting to “both” for any column you want to be able to resort by.

To demonstrate sorting the price column I start by creating a new View Definition with pretty much all the defaults except I move the Price column to the first position (Note: the column you want to be the first sort does NOT have to be in the first position).

Next, I update the rest service that has been used repeatedly to look for the sortColumn and sortOrder query string parameters:

<xe:restService id="restService1" pathInfo="used-cars-phil-chevy-tahoe-basic"
		state="false">
		<xe:this.service>
			<xe:viewJsonService systemColumns="2"
				viewName="xspPhilPaChevTahoe" defaultColumns="true" count="1000">
				<xe:this.databaseName><![CDATA[#{javascript:@DbName()[0]+"!!demos\\used_cars.nsf"}]]></xe:this.databaseName>
				<xe:this.sortColumn><![CDATA[#{javascript:context.getUrlParameter("sortColumn")!="" ? context.getUrlParameter("sortColumn") : ""}]]></xe:this.sortColumn>
				<xe:this.sortOrder><![CDATA[#{javascript:context.getUrlParameter("sortOrder")!="" ? context.getUrlParameter("sortOrder") : ""}]]></xe:this.sortOrder>
			</xe:viewJsonService>
		</xe:this.service>
	</xe:restService>

Finally, the Flexible View Control has a queryString parameter that can be utilized to pass url parameters to the rest service being called to retrieve data.

context.getUrlParameter("viewdef") == "used-cars-sorting-server-byprice" ? "&sortColumn=PRICE&sortOrder=descending" : ""

The Results

viewBasicSorting.xsp?viewdef=used-cars-sorting-server-byprice

Price column sorted server-side

While we get the desired result, notice that there is no indication in the column header that Price is the sorted column. Only by examining the data can you determine that.


A Flexible View Control for XPages Part 5 – Processing Selected Rows

The previous post in this series demonstrated how to add click events to a view created with the Flexible View Control utilizing the callbacks that are built into DataTables. But once a row (or rows) is selected, how do you actually DO something with the selection?

Getting a Handle On Selected Rows

There is a hidden field on the control that stores the @unid of the selected rows along with any other data the View Definition configured to return when selected (in JSON format). When the control is rendered, a class is applied to the field based on the “thisView” parameter given to the control.

Client-Side Data

In the demo we built in Part 4, we gave our thisView parameter the value “viewBasic”. This allows us to reference the selected row(s) client-side in jQuery with the syntax:

$('.fldviewBasic').val();

Using the demo from http://demos.xpage.me/demos/datatables-xpages-bootstrap.nsf/viewBasicCallbacks.xsp, when I select a row and examine the hidden field in dev tools I see:

Hidden field with selected row data stored as JSON

What if I select multiple rows?

What if I want to return data besides just the row’s document id? To do so, I update the View Definition to tell it to return the columns I want when I click a row:

In this example, I want to return the ID and VIN columns in addition to @unid.

Important Note: By default, the @unid value is returned when a row is clicked. The Return Value of the View Definition overrides this value. Therefore, if values are entered in this field on the View Definition, @unid needs to be included if that value needs to be accessed.

Server-Side Data

The Flexible View Control also makes it easy to pass the selected rows server-side. The aforementioned hidden field is bound to a viewScope mapped to the thisView value.

thisView composite data bound to a viewScope

To demonstrate, I’m adding a button to my example above that does a partial refresh on a panel and executes some server-side code to examine the selected rows:

Server-side action with no document selected
Server-side action with a document selected

Recap

The Flexible View Control for XPages makes it very easy to get a handle on the rows selected in a view and process that data both client-side and server-side

In the next post …

I’ll start to demonstrate the “flexible” part of the Flexible View Control by showing how a Domino view with over 2 million records can be mined to create different representations of data with the control through the power of the View Definitions.


A Flexible View Control for XPages Part 4 – Callbacks & Click Events

Regardless of the type of application you’re working with, when interacting with view data you typically want to be able to take some type of action on that data, such as open a document or manipulate the data in some way.

Callbacks

DataTables, being very callback “heavy”, has two callbacks that can be utilized to add row-level functionality to take action on a clicked/double-clicked row and its data:

CallbackFrom the DataTables documentation
rowCallbackThis callback allows you to ‘post process’ each row after it have been generated for each table draw, but before it is rendered into the document.
createdRowThis callback is executed when a TR element is created (and all TD child elements have been inserted), or registered if using a DOM source, allowing manipulation of the TR element.

The Flexible View Control has properties that make incorporating these callbacks into your table build quite easy.

Flexible View Control createdRow and rowCallback

The View Control has a scriptBlock that builds a JavaScript object at runtime which contains the DataTable initialization code. This initialization code contains placeholders for rowCallback and createdRow (as well as other callbacks) that are evaluated by Expression Language to create function calls at runtime. The necessary function parameters are passed in automatically.

Callbacks created with Expression Language

You’ll notice in the createdRow callback above that by default the documentId of each row is added as a class parameter. As you will see, this makes it easy to identify rows that have been clicked/double-clicked when needing to take action.

The Flexible View Control source code has a default rowCallback function that can be utilized to add some basic click/double-click actions. Building on the demo created in the previous post, I’m going to add this rowCallback to that control.

Adding the rowCallback function to the control

Note: It’s important to use the correct syntax when supplying a function to a callback property in the view control. Since Expression Language is being used to dynamically create the function call, the “()” are not needed.

CorrectccRestView.defaultRowCallback
IncorrectccRestView.defaultRowCallback()

The defaultRowCallback code is below:

defaultRowCallback : function(row,data,index,params,o) {
		var attr = $(row).attr("data-docid");
		
		// For some browsers, `attr` is undefined; for others, `attr` is false. Check for both.
		if (typeof attr !== typeof undefined && attr !== false) {
		  // Element has this attribute
			return;
		}
		
		// add some row attr
		$(row).attr("data-docid",data['@unid']);
		$(row).attr("data-xpage",data[o.xpage]);

                // These are defined by the return values field on the view definition
		for (var x=0;x<params.length;x++) {		
			params[x] != "@unid" ? $(row).attr("data-value-"+params[x],data[params[x]]) : "";
		}
		
		var retData = ccRestView.getReturnData(o,data);
	
		$(row).attr("data-return",JSON.stringify(retData));
		$(row).click(function(ev) {
		
			// 	Get the row data 
			var retData = $(row).attr("data-return");

			if ($("td",$(this)).hasClass("rowSelectOn")) {
							
				if (o.multiValue=="true") {
					
					if (ev.ctrlKey && ev.shiftKey) {
						// do nothing
						
					} else if (ev.ctrlKey) {
						// Remove the selected class from the selected row
						ccRestView.removeSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
						
					} else if (ev.shiftKey) {
						
						if (index > window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex) {
							
							$("."+o.dataTableClass + " tbody tr").each(function(rowIndex) {
								
								if (rowIndex >= window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex && rowIndex <= index) {
									retData = $(this).attr("data-return");
									ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this)
								}
							})
						} else {
							console.log("select rows " + index + " to " + window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex);
						}
					} else {
						// no keys pressed.  select this row only
						
						ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);								
						ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
						window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
					}
				} else {
					// Remove the selected class from the selected row
					ccRestView.removeSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
				}
							
			} else {
				
				if (o.multiValue!="true") {
					// Remove the selected class from all rows first
					ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);
					ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
				} else {
					// multi
					if (ev.shifKey && ev.ctrlKey) {
						
					} else if (ev.ctrlKey) {
						ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
						window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
					} else if (ev.shiftKey) {
						ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o, this);
						
						if (index > window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex) {
							
							$(o.dataTableClass + " tbody tr").each(function(rowIndex) {
								
								if ($(this).attr("data-index") >= window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex && $(this).attr("data-index") <= index) {
									retData = $(this).attr("data-return");
									ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this)
								}
							})
						} else {
							console.log("select rows " + index + " to " + window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex);
						}
					} else {
						ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);
						ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this, function() {
							
						});
						window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
					}
					
				}
						
			}
			
		}); // end click
		
		$(row).dblclick(function() {
			
			// get the unid of the double clicked row
			var docid = $(this).attr("data-docid");
			href = location.href.split(".nsf");
			location.href=href[0]+".nsf/"+o.xpage+".xsp?documentId="+docid+"&action=editDocument";
		});

Click Events

So what exactly is the rowCallback doing?

First, some attributes are added to the row dom to make it easier to reference this row by the @unid when it’s clicked or double-clicked:

var attr = $(row).attr("data-docid");
		
		// For some browsers, `attr` is undefined; for others, `attr` is false. Check for both.
		if (typeof attr !== typeof undefined && attr !== false) {
		  // Element has this attribute
			return;
		}
		
		// add some row attr
		$(row).attr("data-docid",data['@unid']);

The data-xpage attribute is added to store the XPage that should be opened when this row is double-clicked. This value typically comes from the View Definition:

$(row).attr("data-xpage",data[o.xpage]);

Next, more parameters are added. This portion of the code is useful when data besides @unid needs to be extracted from a row and passed on to another process.

// These are defined by the return values field on the view definition
		for (var x=0;x<params.length;x++) {		
			params[x] != "@unid" ? $(row).attr("data-value-"+params[x],data[params[x]]) : "";
		}
		
		var retData = ccRestView.getReturnData(o,data);
	
		$(row).attr("data-return",JSON.stringify(retData));

Now, we add the click event to every row. When a row is clicked the following evaluations are made:

  • Does this view allow multiple selections?
    • If so, check for other key presses (ctrl, shift). The control handles multiple selections like windows explorer.
  • Is this row already selected?
    • If not, add a class that changes the row color and add the row @unid to a hidden field (more on this in the next post).
    • If so, remove the class that changes the row color and remove the @unid from the hidden field.
        $(row).click(function(ev) {
         
            //  Get the row data 
            var retData = $(row).attr("data-return");
 
            if ($("td",$(this)).hasClass("rowSelectOn")) {
                             
                if (o.multiValue=="true") {
                     
                    if (ev.ctrlKey && ev.shiftKey) {
                        // do nothing
                         
                    } else if (ev.ctrlKey) {
                        // Remove the selected class from the selected row
                        ccRestView.removeSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
                         
                    } else if (ev.shiftKey) {
                         
                        if (index > window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex) {
                             
                            $("."+o.dataTableClass + " tbody tr").each(function(rowIndex) {
                                 
                                if (rowIndex >= window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex && rowIndex <= index) {
                                    retData = $(this).attr("data-return");
                                    ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this)
                                }
                            })
                        } else {
                            console.log("select rows " + index + " to " + window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex);
                        }
                    } else {
                        // no keys pressed.  select this row only
                         
                        ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);                               
                        ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
                        window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
                    }
                } else {
                    // Remove the selected class from the selected row
                    ccRestView.removeSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
                }
                             
            } else {
                 
                if (o.multiValue!="true") {
                    // Remove the selected class from all rows first
                    ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);
                    ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
                } else {
                    // multi
                    if (ev.shifKey && ev.ctrlKey) {
                         
                    } else if (ev.ctrlKey) {
                        ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this);
                        window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
                    } else if (ev.shiftKey) {
                        ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o, this);
                         
                        if (index > window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex) {
                             
                            $(o.dataTableClass + " tbody tr").each(function(rowIndex) {
                                 
                                if ($(this).attr("data-index") >= window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex && $(this).attr("data-index") <= index) {
                                    retData = $(this).attr("data-return");
                                    ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this)
                                }
                            })
                        } else {
                            console.log("select rows " + index + " to " + window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex);
                        }
                    } else {
                        ccRestView.clearSelectedRows(o,this);
                        ccRestView.insertSelectedRow(o,retData,this, function() {
                             
                        });
                        window[o.thisView].config.firstIndex = index;
                    }
                     
                }
                         
            }
             
        }); // end click

The double-click event is much simpler. It simply opens the selected document using the XPage defined on the View Definition:

$(row).dblclick(function() {
			
			// get the unid of the double clicked row
			var docid = $(this).attr("data-docid");
			href = location.href.split(".nsf");
			location.href=href[0]+".nsf/"+o.xpage+".xsp?documentId="+docid+"&action=editDocument";
		});

Selecting Multiple Rows

Set the multiValue property of the view control to true:

Now, I can select multiple documents by holding <ctrl> or <shift> when clicking:

Building a Demo

In order to demonstrate everything described above, I’m going to make a copy of my viewBasic XPage that was created in Part 3, call it viewBasicCallbacks and add the rowCallback:

I’m leaving everything else intact – using the same settings and the same View Definition.

To demo the double-click, I create a basic XPage to display a used car record and I need to update my View Definition so that when I double click a row in the view it opens this carDocument XPage:

carDocument XPage
Adding carDocument to the View Definition
Double-clicking a row opens the selected document with the carDocument XPage

Here’s the link: http://demos.xpage.me/demos/datatables-xpages-bootstrap.nsf/viewBasicCallbacks.xsp

In the next post …

We will see how the selected rows can be accessed both client and server side.


A Flexible View Control for XPages Part 3 – Create a Basic View

See the demo live

You can see the demo created in this post here.  As more demos are added to demonstrate the many features of the Flexible View Control, they too will be available online.

In Parts 1 & 2 we learned about the Fexible View Control and created the configuration we needed to get started with our application.

The Data

Now, we are going to create a view from scratch utilizing a database of 2 million records comprised of used car data.

To get started I need to add the used car database to my configuration document so the View Definition XPage can read the views in this database.

As mentioned in a previous post, and as you can see above, I’m using Bootstrap (3.4) in my application for my UI framework.  I’ve already created a navigator custom control:

and an XPage template I’m going to use to create all of my demo pages:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xp:view xmlns:xp="http://www.ibm.com/xsp/core"
	xmlns:xc="http://www.ibm.com/xsp/custom" styleClass=""
	style="overflow:hidden">
	<xp:this.resources>
		<xp:script src="/ssjsCCRestView.jss" clientSide="false"></xp:script>
	</xp:this.resources>
	<div class="level0-flex-container">
		<div class="level0-flex-item">
			<xc:ccNav></xc:ccNav>
		</div>
		<xp:panel styleClass="actionBar" id="panelActionBar" style="">


		</xp:panel>
<!-- Drag ccRestView here


 -->

	</div>
</xp:view>

We’re going to get started with the most basic implementation of the Flexible View Control. In my used car database, I have a view xspPhilPaChevTahoe which shows all of the Chevy Tahoes in Philadelphia, PA. Normally I wouldn’t create a single purpose view like this – it’s being done for demonstration purposes only. In a database of 2M records, this view contains 70 and I’m going to display it with the Flexible View Control.

The View Definition

First, I create a View Definition and point it to the xspPhilPaChevTahoe view in the used car database and select all of the columns.

The REST Service

Next, I create the Rest Service that will be used to fetch the data. We told the View Definition to find the REST service on the restServices XPage. This is where I add mine and give it a path-info that matches the key I used in my View Definition above.

After building the application I do a quick test to make sure I’m getting data from the Rest Service:

The XPage

To create my page where I want to put my view, I create a copy of the XPage template and call it viewBasic. I also add a link to the Open button in my navigator custom control that will open this new XPage.

The Flexible View Control

Now, I’m ready to add the control to my new XPage by dragging it from the custom control palette:

viewBasic XPage before custom control is added
viewBasic XPage after custom control is added (source view)
viewBasic XPage after custom control is added (design view)

After adding the custom control, take a look at the custom properties by clicking on the control and then clicking the Custom Properties on the Properties tab. There are a lot of properties (some of which have default values) which are integral to making this the “Flexible” View Control for XPages. Some of these properties get passed on to DataTables as the view is constructed.

ccRestView custom properties

Most importantly, there are three properties that must be set in order for the control to work properly.

PropertyDescription
thisViewUnique identifier for this view. This value is used in the internals of the custom control to get a handle on this instance of the view control.
viewKeyThis value refers to the View Definition that the control will use to get its configuration and location of rest data.
dataTableClassA CSS class name that gets applied to the DataTable and is used to refer to the table programmatically. This value should be unique.

On my viewBasic XPage I use the following values:

The Results

After saving and building I load my viewBasic XPage in the browser and verify I am getting the results I expect:

What we have now in our browser is a DataTable (v. 1.10.19) and all of the standard front end tools that come baked into that framework, such as filtering, sorting, etc.

Recap

The purpose of this post was to demonstrate how easy it is to quickly add a view to your application using the Flexible View Control for XPages:

  1. Create a View Definition.
  2. Create a REST Service (or reuse an existing service) that points to your Domino view.
  3. Add the custom control to your XPage and point it to your View Definition

Next

In the next post, I’m going to take this simple example and start adding advanced functionality to create more functional views.


Boot your alerts in the … with bootAlert

Unfortunately, due to the sudden illness and ultimate passing of a family member in the fall, it has been quite a while since I last blogged.  Hopefully, this post finds me getting back on the blogging horse to contribute some content to the Xpages/Domino community and bring some ideas I had been kicking around to fruition.

Today I am releasing bootAlert, a simple XPages custom control that allows developers to add configurable, reusable Bootstrap alerts to their apps without having to add any additional plugins.  You should already be using Bootstrap/jQuery in your application in order to use this custom control.

For the past few months, in working on our application migration project, I built a configurable Bootstrap alert custom control.  I found myself continuing to add features as different needs arose.  So, I thought I would release it to the community.

Why bootAlert?

  • bootAlert can be triggered from both server and client-side Javascript
  • bootAlert can use Font Awesome icons
  • bootAlert can be turned into a Growl-like message on-the-fly
  • bootAlert is dynamically configurable – one action may require the 'success' class and another may require a 'warning' or 'danger' notification.  One control can be used to display all three.
  • bootAlert can be customized with css
  • Add as many bootAlert controls to your page as you want

bootAlert with view.postScript

bootAlert can be triggered from server-side js with view.postScript()

bootAlert let's you add Bootstrap Growl messages

bootAlert let’s you add Bootstrap Growl messages to your application

Demo

I plan on submitting this as an OpenNtf project, but for now you can find a demo, as well as download bootAlert here

A github repo can be found here.

Getting Started

Getting started with bootAlert is easy.  Simply:

  • Download the demo database
  • Copy the custom control and script library into your application (or copy the contents of the script library into your existsing client-side script library)
  • Drag the custom control onto your xpage and populate the alertName property
<xc:ccBootAlert alertName="alertDemo2" id="ccBootAlertDemo2"></xc:ccBootAlert>
  • Call bootAlert from client-side js …
// Client side js 
var o = {}
o.title = "Client Side";
o.body = "This alert is being generated by client side javascript";
o.alertType = "danger";
o.alertIcon = "fa-calendar fa-lg"
bootAlert.show('alertDemo2',JSON.stringify(o))
  • or call bootAlert from server-side js by putting a value into a requestScope variable and making sure the bootAlert control is part of the partial refresh target:
// Server side js 
// This method assumes the alert is part of a partial refresh target
var o = {};
o.title = "Server Side";
o.body = "This alert is being generated from ssjs";
o.alertType = "info";
// The requestScope var name should match the alertName given to the bootAlert control
requestScope.put("alertDemo2",o);  
  • Finally, you can use view.postScript() to trigger a bootAlert:
// Server side js
// The alert custom control does NOT need to be part of a partial refresh target
// The parameters being passed to bootAlert need to be serialized
var o = {}
o.title = "Server Side > Client Side";
o.body = "This alert is being triggered by client side js called from server side js";
o.alertType = "warning";
o.autoClose = false;
view.postScript("bootAlert.show('alertDemo2'," + toJson(o) + ")");

I hope others find this control as useful as I have in my projects!


Modernizing A Notes App With XPages (MANA-X) Part 1 – Introduction

A few weeks ago, I started a new position. For this position, I was hired specifically to lead the transition of a key Lotus Notes client application into the XPages world, where modern capabilities and UI can be merged together to create a great user experience and better support the business processes going forward.

Actually, this application is more than just a “key” application. It is THE application. Well, technically, it is several applications, or modules, all tied together under one umbrella, which have supported just about every aspect of a business that has tripled in size in the last 10-15 years.

While there is an urge to jump right in and start coding, there are many things to consider ahead of time:

  • Technical – Which framework(s) to use? Getting the development team up to speed on source control for better code management. Developing for IE9/IE11.
  • Cultural – How to introduce users to a modern web application when they are used to working in the Lotus Notes client?
  • Infrastructure – Keeping users productive with high availability. Making sure remote users do not have performance issues.

This is in no way intended to be a comprehensive list; These are just a few of the issues we’ve started to discuss as a team in the early stages of project planning.

Over the course of the coming months (years?), I’m hoping to share our experiences of moving this massive application to XPages and all of the successes and challenges that come with that (as much as I can, anyway).

Disclaimer: Any opinions and views expressed are my own and not necessarily those of my company. This series is intended as one company’s experience of moving an application to XPages and not a definitive guide on how to migrate an application to XPages.


XPages tip: Using jQuery class selectors with hidden inputs

If you cut your XPages teeth by using the out-of-the-box-included dojo libraries, then you are probably intimately familiar with dojo.byId(“#{id:myElementID}”) to locate elements on your XPage based on the id attribute.

After starting to weave jQuery into your projects, you probably realized pretty quickly that the jQuery id selector syntax of $(“#myElementID”) does not work well with XPage component ids. But of course there is a solution for that – Marky Roden’s XSnippet which wraps the jQuery ID selector function in a XPage version.

Due to the above issues with getting elements by ID in jQuery, you probably started using class selectors such as $(“.myClassName”). This is all fine and good – until you go to add a class to the properties panel of a hidden input control:

As you can see from the screenshot above, there is no place to enter a class name in the properties for a hidden input control. Seems kind of silly, doesn’t it? It’s a field. Fields have classes. I should be able to add a class to a hidden field. Apparently not.

Luckily, there is an incredibly simple way to do this using the attrs properties in the basics section of the properties panel:

2014-08-17_23-05-43
  • Add a new attribute by clicking the plus sign
  • In the name field, enter “class” (do not add the quotes)
  • In the value field, enter the name of your class, for example, “myClassName” (again, no quotes)

Now, you should be able to access your hidden input using a jQuery selector.


My first OpenNTF project – Dojo Name Picker

A few years ago I created a Name Picker for an XPages project I was working on at the time.  The application had several fields that required the selection of users from the address book, but the available options at the time did not fit the bill.  In addition, this was the first XPages application for this user base after being firmly entrenched in Notes Client applications for many years.  As a result, there was a need to provide some functionality that helped build a bridge from Notes Client to web/XPage applications.  Being able to select users from an address book in a similar manner as the Notes Client was a good place to build this bridge.

Multi Select Name Picker

Multi Select Name Picker

Single Select Name Picker

Single Select Name Picker

Why not just use the ExtLib version?

When I first started building this control, the ExtLib version did not exist yet.  Even after ExtLib was released, the environment where this was born did not have ExtLib installed on their servers.  In my testing against the ExtLib name picker, this version outperformed it using the 40k entry address book, fakenames.nsf, as well as provides functionality that does not exist in the ExtLib version.

The key features of Dojo Name Picker 1.0 include:

  • Ability to choose People, People & Groups, or just Groups.
  • Multi Select via a dual column dialog.
  • Single Select via a single column dialog.
  • Lazy loading of additional entries when scrolling up or down.
  • Only creates one dojo dialog widget no matter how many names fields are needed on a form.
  • In Firefox and XPiNC the dialog will also display the associated icon for an entry (IE and Chrome do not support option tag background images).
  • Ability have the name picker execute a function with the selected value(s) being passed to the function as a parameter.
  • Ability to specify a partial refresh target on dialog close.
  • No dependency on ExtLib.
  • Will work on 8.5.3 and above (will probably work on 8.5.2 but this release has not been tested on that version).

You can test the name picker for yourself via a live demo here.

You can view this project on OpenNTF here.

Future Enhancements

While I feel this is a good, solid release, there are some improvements I would like to make:

  • Bootstrap version (coming soon!) .
  • Improved caching.
  • Ability to return selected items as a JSON string.
  • Ability to define additional fields to pull from the NAB
  • Support multiple address books

Thanks for checking it out!


Copying Custom Controls

This tip is pretty simple, and it might be common knowledge to most people, but I stumbled onto it pretty much by accident.

Copying a custom control from one XPage to another is fairly common, but when you do so and go to build your new page, you get the message:

The prefix “xc” for element “xc:ccTest” is not bound.

error_message

Previously, I never really bothered to look into this message any further.  I took the easy way out and simply dragged a new copy of the custom control onto the XPage, copied any custom properties (if any), and went on my way.  However, this can get annoying REAL fast if you have a lot of custom controls that need to be copied.

Luckily, there is a ridiculously easy way to quickly get rid of the above message.

When you create a new Xpage, the standard markup looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> 
<xp:view xmlns:xp="http://www.ibm.com/xsp/core"> </xp:view>

Look what happens as soon as you drag a custom control on to your XPage:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xp:view xmlns:xp="http://www.ibm.com/xsp/core"
	xmlns:xc="http://www.ibm.com/xsp/custom">
	<xc:ccTest></xc:ccTest>
</xp:view>

Adding the bolded line above to the xp:view tag of your page will allow you to copy custom controls to your XPage without frustration.  At the end of the day is it really a big time saver?  No.  But at least you have a better understanding of the error message.